Humanities Lost Knowledge

Humanities Lost Knowledge.  Have you ever wondered where all our knowledge goes?  The great knowledge that we have accumulated throughout our lives.  All the things we have learned, seen, felt, experienced, heard are who we are and when we are gone, where does all that go? I would hope that some of it would have been conveyed to my children, grandchildren, and friends.
Is there a place in the universe that stores it all in a secret box just waiting to be opened? Yes, there is. It’s our family’s and friends’ knowledge turned into memories. Express yourself. Share your knowledge with everyone around you especially your children, grandchildren, nieces, cousins, and friends. 
Have you ever just noticed someone passing by and thought, I wonder what kind of things are in their brain? What do they know, where have they been, what have they learned? The only way we can know these things is to talk to these people and find out their stories.


Small towns, rural communities have a way of fixing part of this problem, it’s called the café, diner, or local restaurant.
The locals go in for meals, meet people they know, share stories and catch up on any news. It’s not considered gossip or our media’s yellow journalism, it is neighbors keeping neighbors informed. Letting them know who is getting married, so and so’s niece had a baby, or the rancher down the road needs help putting up his hay because he had a heart attack.

But what do we really know? It took a lifetime to gather all this knowledge so how can we share it in a shorter amount of time? Piece by piece we exchange ideas and information with others when we have conversations. We use the information we have gathered when we help someone or try to soothe a child’s cry. How we react to other people, express our opinions, and make people feel comfortable. 

Don’t keep all that information locked up inside yourself. Share it, talk to people and share your story. Let people know you are interested in their story and help them share theirs. Our ancestors always shared their stories.

The elders gathered the youngsters around and told the stories of their youth. That way their ancestors were never forgotten and the knowledge they had was never lost.  Their knowledge was brought through the years in stories.

The elders of our society have so much information stored up. If you ever sat and just listened to one of our elder citizens, your head would explode with stories and information. Important information, silly information, and some that would help you go forward in life.
We think that because we have lived our life with all the progress we have experienced, we know more than the ones that lived before us. Yes, we have information, new information but their information got them to the place where they are. We can’t forget the knowledge learned in the past. It enabled our society to come to this point of progress.

Knowledge is the most important thing we own. It’s ours, it’s our private information, but if we don’t use it we can never know how important it is. It just quietly sits there in the back of our minds, not pushing or prodding to get out. Once let loose though, it’s like a wave of information that doesn’t stop. Let it go, give it a place to show its stuff. We all have it but some think they don’t have what it takes to let it out. But you do.

Your information has several sides, some that aren’t always nice or friendly. No one knows what it will be until it is out there where you can examine it and know what it is. Start with a child and explain all information is important. Be that one person that breaks the dam and lets the information flow for someone.   You’ll never know what wonderful knowledge you’ve released until you do it.

Come check out my other great blog posts about Homesteading Life!

https://dustsweatboots.com/grazing-out-the-front-door-with-wild-plants/

https://dustsweatboots.com/what-a-day-a-set-of-triplets-2-sets-of-twins/

https://dustsweatboots.com/confidence-with-wood-stoves/

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